The Vietnam War and the Anti Vietnam War Trap

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But without the Vietnam War and the "anti-war" movement, the Isis cult would have been contained to a fringe phenomenon -- no bigger than the beatnik cult of the 1950s that was an outgrowth of the early Huxley ventures in California. The Vietnam War created the climate of moral despair that opened America's youth to drugs.

Under Kennedy, American military involvement in Vietnam -- which had been vetoed by the Eisenhower administration -- was initiated on a limited scale. Under Lyndon Johnson, American military presence in Vietnam was massively escalated, at the same time that U.S. efforts were restricted -- the framework of "limited war." Playing on the President's profile, the anglophile Eastern Establishment, typified by top White House national security aide McGeorge Bundy and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara, convinced President Johnson that under the nuclear "balance of terror," or the regime of Mutual and Assured Destruction, the United States could afford neither a political solution to the conflict, nor the commitment to a military victory.

The outcome of this debacle was a major strategic withdrawal from Asia by the United States, spelled out in Henry Kissinger's "Guam Doctrine," adoption of the spectacular failure known as the "China Card" strategy for containing Soviet influence, and demoralization of the American people over the war to the point that the sense of national pride and confidence in the future progress of the republic was badly damaged.

Just as Aldous Huxley began the counterculture subversion of the United States thirty years before its consequences became evident to the public, Lord Bertrand Russell began laying the foundations for the anti-war movement of the 1960s before the 1930s expired. Russell's "pacifism" was always relative -- the means to his most cherished end, one-world government on the imperial model, that would curb the nation-state and its persistent tendency toward republicanism and technological progress.

Lord Russell and Aldous Huxley cofounded the Peace Pledge Union in 1937 campaigning for peace with Hitler-just before both went to the United States for the duration of World War.20 During World War II, Lord Russell opposed British and American warfare against the Nazis. 1111947, when the United States was in possession of the atomic bomb and Russia was not, Russell loudly advocated that the United States order the Soviets to surrender to a one-world government that would enjoy a restrictive monopoly on nuclear weapons, under the threat of a preemptive World War III against the Soviet Union. His 1950s "Ban the Bomb" movement was directed to the same end-it functioned as an anti-technology movement against the peace-through-economic development potentials represented by President Eisenhower's "Atoms for Peace"' initiative.

From the mid-1950s onward, Russell's principal assignment was to build an international anti-war and anti-American movement. Coincident with the escalation of U.S. involvement in Vietnam under British manipulation, Russell upgraded the old Peace Pledge Union (which had been used in West Germany throughout the postwar period to promote an anti-capitalist "New left" wing of the Social Democratic Party, recruiting several future members of the Baader-Meinhof terrorist gang in the process) into the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation.

In the United States, the New York banks provided several hundred thousand dollars to establish the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS), effectively the U.S. branch of the Russell Peace Foundation. Among the founding trustees of the IPS was James Warburg, directly representing the family's interests.

IPS drew its most active operatives from a variety of British-dominated institutions. IPS founding director Marcus Raskin was a member of the Kennedy administration's National

Security Council and also a fellow of the National Training Labs, a U.S. subsidiary of the Tavistock Institute founded by Dr. Kurt Lewin.

After its creation by the League for Industrial Democracy, Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), the umbrella of the student anti-war movement, was in turn financed and run through IPS -- up through and beyond its splintering into a number of terrorist and Maoist gangs in the late 1960s.21 More broadly, the institutions and outlook of the U.S. anti-war movement were dominated by the direct political descendants of the British-dominated "socialist movement" in the U.S.A., fostered by the House of Morgan as far back as the years before World War!.

This is not to say that the majority of anti-war protesters were paid, certified British agents. On the contrary, the overwhelming majority of anti-war protesters went into SDS on the basis of outrage at the developments in Vietnam. But once caught in the environment defined by Russell and the Tavistock Institute's psychological warfare experts, and inundated with the message that hedonistic pleasure-seeking was a legitimate alternative to "immoral war," their sense of values and their creative potential went up in a cloud of hashish smoke.

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