Potassium Cyanide

Li 63
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FIG. L90. POTASSIUM CYANIDE

POTASSIUM CYANIDE KCN

This compound was investigated in 1922. The following extract from a letter written by Mr. Leadbeater on September 9th, 1922, illustrates the way in which he approached this work and the patience with which he repeated his observations in order to be quite sure of the facts. The compound KCN is a fairly complex one, and all the component parts of the three elements have to be fitted in.

" I have spent several hours over KCN, and by patiently taking it section by section, disturbing its groupings and then watching them flow back again, I have at last been able to draw some sort of plan of its arrangements. It is very roughly done, I fear, for I have no skill in such matters, and it is of course only a two-dimensional diagram of something which really exists in three or four dimensions, but it may give you some idea of this uncomfortably complex substance.

The molecule is not symmetrical, but it has a strongly-marked tendency to float in a particular position with the group of three bars pointing upwards, so I have marked that ' top'. The actual centre consists of four Carbon Anu, next come two Nitrogen balloons, revolving violently round that centre, and apparently paying no attention whatever to the groups of spikes and funnels which surround them, all of which are moving very much more slowly.

Each of the sub-sections has become to some extent a separate entity, rotating on its own axis at right angles to the general scheme, like a pencil rolled between finger and thumb, but always pointing to the vigorously-active centre. It would seem that each Potassium spike and each pair of Carbon funnels have annexed one of the smaller bodies from Nitrogen, and decline to be separated from it."

It will be seen from the diagram that the grand centre is formed by four Anu. These obviously come from the centre of the Carbon atom, and are the four Carbon Anu referred to by Mr. Leadbeater.

The four sets of funnels from the Carbon atom are situated as shown and each pair adds a group from Nitrogen, either N24 or N20. It may be that these are really placed at the corners of a tetrahedron, so making the three-dimensional form as suggested by Mr. Leadbeater.

The remainder of the Nitrogen atom is split up. The seven N9 groups from the larger group N63, attach themselves to Li63 spikes from the Potassium, while the ' balloon,' now identified as N110, revolves round the grand centre.

The other N110 which revolves round the grand centre comes from the Potassium, as do the nine Li63 spikes and the six little Li4 spheres.

ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

Carbon is an octahedron composed of eight funnels, four of which are positive and four negative Fig. 191 gives two of the funnels, one positive and one negative, spread out flat, with the single loose Anu which binds them. ç

It is interesting to note that chemists have tried to

conceive of the quadrivalence of the Carbon atom, represented diagram ma tically as

as four valencies radiating from the centre of a tetrahedron to its four corners. No chemist has, so far, conceived of the Carbon atom as consisting of eight half valencies, in the eight directions represented by the eight faces of an octahedron. This, however, is what is seen by clairvoyance.

FIG. 19L CARBON

METHANE CH,

Methane is the simplest of the Carbon open-chain series, being composed of one Carbon and four Hydrogen atoms.

The combination of four Hydrogen atoms with one Carbon atom is seen in Fig. 192. The four Hydrogen atoms break up into eight triangular groups, four of which are positive and four negative. Each positive group floats at the mouth of a negative Carbon funnel and each negative group at the mouth of a positive funnel.

FIG. 19L CARBON

FIG. 192. METHANE CH,

FIG. 193. METHYL CHLORIDE CH„C1

METHYL CHLORIDE CH.Cl

The first Carbon compound of the chain series. Methane CH4, was shown in Fig. 192. Methane is represented as

Methyl Chloride is made by the substitution of a Chlorine atom for one Hydrogen.

Chlorine, which is a dumb-bell, undergoes disruption. Its two ends, each ot which consists of a central sphere whence radiate twelve funnels, separate from the central rod. This central rod itself breaks up. The result is shown in Fig. 193.

It was mentioned earlier that in the central rod of Sodium there appears a body of six Anu. This body is positive, and appears to act as the centre of the whole atom of Sodium. Similarly in Chlorine, the centre of it all is a body of five Anu in its central rod. This body of five Anu is positive. When Chlorine breaks up, this body of five Anu takes one end of Chlorine with it, and floats over a negative funnel of Carbon. The remaining bodies of the central rod, two of four and two of three Anu, go with the second end of Chlorine and float over a positive funnel of Carbon. Over each of the six remaining funnels of Carbon, there floats a half-Hydrogen triangle, as in Methane.

ISOMER OF METHYL CHLORIDE CH.Cl

A variant of Methyl Chloride was observed, which is slightly different in the distribution of the five bodies of the central rod. This distribution is as in Fig. 194. Over the mouth of the two Carbon funnels, and under the bodies from the central rod. as in Fig. 193, there float the two ends of Chlorine.

TRICHLOR METHANE CHC1,

When examined clairvoyantly, the appearance of CHC1, is as in Fig. 195.

In the previous combination. Methyl Chloride, CH,C1, the atom of Chlorine was broken up into two parts. Here, however, the three Chlorine atoms are not so broken up, but each attaches itself as a whole to a Carbon funnel. The Chlorine is partly sucked into the funnel. The central rod buckles up and bends in the process. The two flower ends of Chlorine, however, remain outside. One end of the atom of Hydrogen also gets partly sucked into a funnel.

METHYL ALCOHOL CH.OH

Methyl Alcohol differs from Methane in having one Hydrogen atom replaced by the Hydroxyl group, thus

We have seen the appearance of the OH group in Fig. 158. Fig. 196 gives that of CH.OH. The Oxygen stands upright to two Carbon funnels, and the two Hydrogen triangles at its top and bottom are sucked partly into the funnels.

It was noted in the course of the investigations that Oxygen has a great quality of force, and does not break up when combining so as to accommodate itself to other atoms. In the present figure, the investigator described its behaviour as being " stiff as a poker ".

FIG. 196. METHYL ALCOHOL CH.OH

FIG. 196. METHYL ALCOHOL CH.OH

FIG. 197. TWO CARBON ATOMS LINKED TO EACH OTHER

FIG. 197. TWO CARBON ATOMS LINKED TO EACH OTHER

FIG. 198. ACETIC ACID CH.COOH

FIG. 199. ACETYLENE CaHa

ETHANE C.H.OH

In this and the following compounds we have two Carbon atoms linked together in a chain.

Fig. 197 shows how this occurs. A positive funnel of one Carbon atom selects a negative funnel of the other Carbon, for the purpose of linking. The linked funnels cannot of course lie on one plane, and therefore the forces which link are curved.

When, therefore. Ethyl Alcohol

is examined. Figures 196 and 197 enable us to see how it is constructed.

ACETIC ACID CH.COOH

When it is realized that a valency of Carbon is distributed into two half-valencies, one positive and the other negative, the structure of Acetic Acid becomes simple. Stated in the usual form, but taking each valency of Carbon to consist of two half-valencies, it is as in Fig. 198.

This odd-looking formula is perfectly clear, if one holds in one's hands two octahedrons, placed side by side as in Fig. 197. The first Carbon with its three Hydrogens is similar to Methane, Fig. 192, so far as the three Hydrogens are concerned. In the second Carbon, the position of each Oxygen is as in Methyl Alcohol, Fig. 1%. that is, upright and at right angles to two funnels. In the formula, to suggest this, the symbol for Oxygen, O, is placed horizontally. The Hydrogen floats, as two half-Hydrogen triangles, over the two remaining funnels. Though these two half-Hydrogens float over two Carbon funnels, and are so to say satisfied, yet owing to the proximity of an Oxygen atom to each of them, they are pulled towards the Oxygens and so are restless.

ACETYLENE C,H,

Acetylene can be produced by dropping water on Calcium Carbide. When this change is looked at clairvoyantly, the Oxygen is seen to fly to the Calcium funnels, releasing the Carbon segments. These Carbon segments arrange themselves in the formation represented by Fig. 199.

The mode of linking C—C is shown in Fig. 197. Four Carbon funnels are thus used up by this linking. The two Hydrogens, broken up into their twelve constituent charge units, each of which contains three Anu, then fly to the remaining twelve funnels of the two Carbon atoms. There is apparently no' double bond between the Carbons in Acetylene.

tartaric acid cooh. choh. choh. cooh

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