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CONE Fe 28

2 Co 11

Co 8

2NI 10

FIG. 145. DISINTEGRATION OF IRON. COBALT AND NICKEL

DISINTEGRATION OF THE BARS GROUP DISINTEGRATION OF IRON. COBALT. NICKEL

Iron. The 14 bars of iron break asunder on the E4 level and each sets free its contents, a cone and three ovoids. Fig. 145.

The cone of twenty-eight Anu becomes a four-sided figure with seven Anu in each face. On the E3 level this cone gives four septets and these are reduced to triplets and units on the E2 level.

The ovoids Fe 14 and Fel6 show crystalline contents on the E4 level and become spherical in shape. On the E3 level these three spheres give four sextets and two quartets of one type and three of another. They reduce to duads of various types on the E2 level

Cobalt. The three lower ovoids in Cobalt are identical with those in Iron. The cone is replaced by three upper ovoids, two being Co.ll and one Co8. These all become spheres on the E4 level. On the E3 level the three lower ovoids behave as in Iron, while the Co.ll gives a sextet and a quintet and the Co8 two quartets. On the E3 level triplets and duads are formed as shown in Fig. 145.

Nickel. The three lower ovoids are identical with those of Iron and Cobalt and disintegrate in the same way.

Of the three upper ovoids, two are Co.ll. The third, NilO, contain a sextet and a quartet and forms a sphere on the E4 level On the E3 level these give a sextet and a quartet and on the E2 level triplets and duads.

All these can be followed in Fig. 145.

Fig. 146 shows the Bars Group in a condensed form, from which the relationships can be studied.

IRON.

COBALT. NICKEL

RUTHENIUM

RHODIUM

PALLADtUM

RUTHENIUM

RHODIUM

PALLADtUM

Z ISOTOPE

OSMIUM

PLATINUM B

OSMIUM

IRIDIUM PLATINUM A

FIG. 146. THE BARS GROUP

PLATINUM B

Nf. ON. ARGON, KRYPTON

TYPES OF THE STAR GROUP

THE STAR GROUP

THIS group comprises those elements known as the inert gases. Their characteristic valence is O. In the Pendulum diagram they appear on the middle line, alternately with the Bars Group.

Each inert gas has the appearance of a flat six-armed star. All the six arms within one element are the same. Fig. 147.

The arms radiate from a central sphere made of five intersecting tetrahedrons. This sphere first occurs in Neon and is the group Nel20 with which we are familiar. Helium, which is classed by chemists with the inert gases, has a different configuration and has been considered in the Hydrogen Group.

Each member of the Star Group has its meta variety or isotope. On examination of the diagrams it will be seen that in each meta variety each of the six arms has seven more Anu. Therefore the difference between Neon and Meta-Neon is exactly forty-two Anu ; and so with all the other elements and their isotopes in the group.

One gas was discovered in the clairvoyant investigations of 1907, for which there is no place in the list of atomic numbers. Its rarity was then described by saying that there might be one in the atmosphere of an ordinary-sized room. It was named by us " Kalon," the " beautiful." and its diagram was published, with that of its meta variety.

ANU

ELEMENT

CENTRE

360

Neon

Nel20

714

Argon

Ne 120

1.464

Krypton

Nel20

2298

Xenon

Ne 120

3.054

Kalon

Nel20

3,990

Radon

6 [Ne22+ (3Li4)+(2H3)] 6 [N63 +• Ne22+Ar 14] 6 [N63 +■ N110+Ne22+mNel5+Arl4] 6 [Xel5+ Xel4+N63+2N110 + Ne22

+ mNel5+Arl4] 6 [Xel5+Xel4+2N63+2N110+2Ne22

+2mNel5+2Arl4+Kal2] 6 [Xel5+Xel4+2N63+3N110+3mNe22 + 3mNel5 + 3Arl4+L7]

NEON

META-NEON

FIG. 148. NEON AND META-NEON

FIG. 148. NEON AND META-NEON

FIG. 149. Nel20

atomic no. 10. NEON

As already stated. Neon is in the form of a flat star, with a central globe and six radiating arms. Fig. 148.

The central globe consists of five interpenetrating tetrahedrons, each tetrahedron being similar to that in Adyarium, Ad24. These five tetrahedrons compose a foim which generates the dodecahedron and icosahedrcn. The group occurs often as the central globe of elements and is distinguished as Nel20. Fig. 149.

Star. Each arm of the star is composed of three bodies, including one of five spheres, Ne22 which occurs in all the members of this group. Then come three Li4, and finally a group containing two triplets. 2H3.

Neon = Nel20+6(Ne22+3Li4+2H3)

Central globe = 120 Anu

Total = 360 Anu

Isotope of Neon. Meta-Neon differs from Neon by the insertion of an additional Anu in each of the groups included in the second body within its arm, and substituting a group of seven Anu for one of the triplets in the final body. Fig. 148.

Central globe = 120 Anu

Six arms of 47 Anu = 282

Total = 402 Anu

Number weight -tk- = 2233

PROTO-ARGON

ARGON

META-ARGON

FIG. 150. ARGON

FIG. 150. ARGON

atomic no 18. ARGON

The central globe is formed of Nel20.

Star. Each arm of the star contains the N63 group, then Ne22 and a new group of fourteen Anu, Arl4.

Argon - Nel20+6(N63+Ne22+Arl4)

Central globe - 120 Anu

Total - 714 Anu

Meta-Argon. This isotope of Argon contains seven more Anu in each arm, the Arl4 being replaced by m-Nel5 and a cone of six Anu.

Meta-Argon - Nel20-f6(N63+Ne22+mNel5+mAr6)

Central globe — 120 Anu

Total ^ 756 Anu

A curious irregularity appears in Argon. When its weight was determined it was found to be heavier than Potassium instead of being lighter. Argon comes, therefore, out of its proper place in the Periodic Table. But clairvoyant research shows that it does not in reality do so; the true Argon does come in its right place, and its number weight is 37.33. We have called the lighter variety proto-Argon. It is extremely rare in the atmosphere, and the ordinarily known Argon is the commoner variety.

Central globe — 120 Anu

Number weight r = 3733

META-KRYPTON

atomic no. 36. KRYPTON

Central globe. As in all the Star Group elements the central globe is Nel20. Star. Each arm of the star contains constituents from Argon and Meta-Argon. with the addition of an N110. The groups N110 and N63 appear constantly in the building up of these elements. When these two bodies appear one above the other there is a strong attraction between them; the sphere-wall of N110 is pulled towards N63. while the sphere wall of the latter undergoes a flattening compression.

Krypton .= Nel20+6(N63+N110+Ne22+mNel5+Arl4) Central globe -= 120 Anu

6 arms of 224 Anu = 1344

Total = 1464 Anu

1464

Meta-Krypton. This isotope is slightly higher in atomic weight, and the two together should make up about the atomic weight given by science.

It differs from Krypton only in the substitution of Ne22 for mN. J in eaci. arm of the star.

Meta-Krypton - Nel20+6(N63+N110+2Ne22+Arl4)

Central globe = 120 Anu

6 arms of 231 Anu = 1386

Total = 1506 Anu

XENON

META-XENON

THE STAR GROUP 257

atomic no 54 XENON

The central globe is Nel20.

Star. Each arm of the star contains the constituents of Krypton, with the addition of another N110 globe and two smaller spheres. Xel4 and Xel5. These are arranged symmetrically as shown in Fig. 152.

Xenon Nel20+6[Xel5+Xel4+N63+2N110+Ne22+mNel5+Arl4] Central globe 120 Anu

6 arms of 363 Anu 2178

Total 2298 Anu

Number weight - 127.66

Meta-Xemm. Again the isotope, being of higher atomic weight, would make the mean value for the element approach that of science.

It differs from Xenon in the substitution of the two bodies. 2Xel8. for Xel5 and Xel4, thus making up the difference of seven Anu.

Meta-Xenon Nel20+6[2mXel8+N63+2N110+Ne22+mNel5+Arl4] Central globe 120 Anu

6 arms of 370 Anu - 2220

KALON

META-KALON

atomic no - KALON

The central globe is, as usual, Nel20.

Star. The arms are now much more complex. Kalon contains twice the constituents of Krypton, with the addition of Xel4 and Xel5 from Xenon and a curious cone. Kal2. possessing a kind of tail. Fig. 153.

Only a few atoms of Kalon and Meta-kalon have been found in the air of a fair-sized room. This probably accounts for the fact that they have not yet been isolated by science.

Kalon - Ne 120+6 [Xel5+Xel4+2N63+2N110+2Ne22+2mNel5+2Arl4 + Kal2] Central globe = 120 Anu

6 arms of 489 Anu = 2934

Total = 3054 Anu

3054

M. eta-Kalon. The isotope contains seven extra Anu. made up, as in the case of Xenon, by the substitution of two mXel8 for Xel5 and Xel4.

Meta-Kalon = Nel20-f 6[2mXel8+2N63+2N110+2Ne22+2mNel5+2Arl4+Kal2] Central globe = 120 Anu

Number weight ^ - 172.00

RADON

META-RADON
FIG. 134. RADON

atomic no «6. RADON

Scientists place Radon in this group of the inert gases. It was first known as Radium Emanation and is formed by the action of the powerful vortex of Radium. The central globe is, as usual, Nel20. Star. The six arms each contain three columns.

Radon = Ne 120+6 (Xel5+Xel4+2N63+3N110 + 3mNe22+3mNel5 + 3Arl4+I.7] Central globe — 120 Anu

6 arms of 645 Anu 3870

Meta-Radon. The meta variety of Radon is extremely rare. It is also noteworthy for the irregularity that in its meta-variety each arm has the extra seven Anu outside the arm, and not within it.

Meta-Radon = Nel20+6 [Xe 15+Xel4+2N63+ 3N110+3mNe22+3mNe 15+3 Ar 14 +1.7

Central globe = 120 Anu

Total : 4032 Anu

NEON I

I

(0 HI

E4 " - - -

CENTRAL GLOBE Ne 120

POINT OF STAR

FIG. 155. DISINTEGRATION OF NEON

FIG. 155. DISINTEGRATION OF NEON

DISINTEGRATION OF THE STAR GROUP DISINTEGRATION OF NEON

In the first stage of the disintegration of Neon on the E4 level the star gives its central globe and six ovoids from the six points of the star. The globe, Nel20, then breaks up further, giving its five tetrahedrons Ad24. The ovoids each liberate three spheres containing 22, 12 and 6 Anu.

On the E3 level the Ad24 each give four Ad6, and the spheres a sextet, four quartets of a cross type, three quartets of the pyramid type and two triads.

On the E2 level the Ad6 each give two triplets and the other groups break up into duads and units.

Many of the component parts of the elements in this group are familiar and their disintegration may be followed under other elements.

Fig. 156 shows the elements of the Star Group in a condensed form, from which their relationships can be studied.

NEON

NEON

FIG. 156. THE STAR GROUP
FIG. 157. THE MOLECULE

OF WATER, H20.

COMPOUNDS

A CHEMICAL compound is formed when two or more different atoms unite to form a new substance. When a compound is observed by clairvoyance it is seen that the atoms do not usually remain separate but that a mingling of the component parts of the constituent atoms takes place. Sometimes the atoms maintain their individuality and sometimes they are very much broken up, but their characteristic groups can easily be traced by reference to the diagrams of the atoms previously given.

The compounds which have been examined are here arranged as far as possible in related groups, first inorganic and then organic compounds.

As with the elements, the diagrams, though sometimes taken from photographs of actual models, are inadequate, and the reader must use his imagination to reconstruct the true molecule.

WATER HjO

Each molecule of water is composed of two Hydrogen atoms and one Oxygen. Fig. 157 shows what happens when these atoms combine. The Oxygen double snake retains its individuality, as indeed it usually does, while the two Hydrogen atoms arrange themselves round it. Fig. 157a shows the Hydrogen atoms as forming with the Oxygen a sphere. Fig. 157b, another photograph of the same model taken from a different point of view, shows that each Hydrogen atom keeps its separate individuality.

THE HYDROXYL GROUP OH

This group is one of » number of distinct groups which keep their form and can be distinguished in many compounds. In the centre we find the double Oxygen snake. The Hydrogen atom divides into its two triangles and floats above and below the Oxygen. It will be noticed that when forming compounds the atoms often break up into the groups which they form when they disintegrate to the E4 level. This shows the importance of a study of the disintegration of the elements. It would seem that the E4 level is connected with chemical change. The appearance of the group is shown in Fig. 158. The upper triangle is positive, and the lower negative. Though these two triangles of Hydrogen are separated, with Oxygen in between, they are still bound to each other, and a linking force goes through the middle of the Oxygen snake. Each triangle rotates flat, and while rotating, sways a little up and down, as the lid of a pot rotates before it finally settles down.

P OH

FIG. 15a THE HYDROXYL GROUP OH
FIG. 159 HYDROGEN PEROXIDE HtO-

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE H.O.

This substance appears to be related to the Hydroxyl group rather than to Water. The appearance of Hydrogen Peroxide is shown in Fig. 159. In drawing each Oxygen atom, the artist has purposely left out die small bodies of two Anu in one of the snakes, in order to make the Oxygen more graphic. Here we have two OH side by side, except that in the second OH the polarity is reversed, and the upper triangle of Hydrogen is negative and the lower positive. The two OH groups do not give the impression of being attracted to each other. But. under certain conditions, one Oxygen atom flies off, and then the two Hydrogen triangles associated with it are attracted to the triangles of the neighbouring OH. and form H.O. Water, as in Fig 157.

An interesting question is why H.O, should be unstable. Investigation shows that there is some kind of a radiation from the earth : whether this force of radiation is due to the sun or not was not investigated. But the earth is steadily pouring out this radiation, and it rushes upwards. As the radiation rushes upwards, it hits the upper Hydrogen triangles which are rotating. Usually the impact makes no difference, as the upper and lower triangles are united by the bond which goes through the Oxygen atom, and the impact of the radiating force is not strong enough to break the link. But it happens that as the triangle rotates, it gets tilted sideways and, if the force from the earth hits it at its moment of greatest tilt, the triangle may be thrown off its balance, thus breaking the link with the lower triangle. Just as a metal disc can be kept revolving at the end of a jet of steam so long as the jet is directly underneath, so is the Hydrogen triangle as it rotates. But just as. if the steam hits the disc when it is aslant, the disc flies off. so it is with the upper triangle when the force from the earth hits it. When it is so thrown off its balance, and the Oxygen atom is released and flies off, that triangle at once flies to the positive Hydrogen triangle nearest to it The positive Hydrogen triangle below then flies to its neighbour, the negative Hydrogen triangle of the neighbouring OH. The result is a molecule of Water.

SODIUM HYDROXIDE NaOH

The arrangement of Oxygen and Hydrogen to make the Hydroxyl group OH was shown in Fig. 158. Sodium has been already described as dumb-bell. The combination Sodium Hydroxide NaOH is as in Fig. 160.

The central rod of Sodium enters inside the Oxygen atom, retaining at cither end its floating funnels. The rod has plenty of space for its movement without touching the Oxygen atom, because the latter has become much fatter and shorter.

The two triangles which make up Hydrogen are separated, as in Hydroxyl, and float above and below Sodium. In Hydroxyl these two triangles are united by a bond which goes through the Oxygen atom. That bond still persists in NaOH, though Sodium has come in the way. We shall see later in Hydrochloric Acid HC1, where there takes place a similar disruption of Hydrogen, the reason for the intense activity of NaOH, when seen clairvoyantly, and probably also for its burning quality.

It is here noteworthy that the chemical combinations examined clairvoyantly produce effects which are not solely mechanical. They radiate a quality of feeling which, however rudimentary, causes a reaction in the observer. Thus the observer, even without any chemical knowledge, would note that NaOH is not a pleasant thing, and that it feels as though it would burn.

HYDROCHLORIC ACID HCI

One atom of Hydrogen and one of Chlorine combine to make a molecule of Hydrochloric Acid. Chlorine is a dumb-bell of the same shape as Sodium. The combination of Hydrogen and Chlorine is as shown in Fig. 161.

The first noticeable change in Chlorine is that its central rod is shorter and fatter than usual, as if compressed. The second change is in the two spheres, of ten Anu each, from which, as the centre, the funnels at either end of the Chlorine atom radiate normally; these two spheres are pulled out of place. All this distortion is due fundamentally to the two triangles of Hydrogen. These two, in their normal state when making the unit of Hydrogen, are linked in a special way, one going through the other. They are separated in Hydroxyl but the linking bond goes through the Oxygen in between. In HCI the bond still remains, though Chlorine comes in between.

In Chlorine each sphere of ten Anu, at top and at bottom, is linked to the little sphere of five Anu in the centre of the rod. This sphere of five is the grand centre of Chlorine. The two spheres of ten are normally held bound to it, and remain at a definite distance from it. But when one half of Hydrogen floats over the NalO at the top, and the second half floats similarly under the NalO at the bottom the spheres are displaced, owing to the strong pull exercised over them by the two halves of Hydrogen. But just as they are being displaced towards the Hydrogen, they are pulled back into place by the grand centre of Chlorine, the little sphere of five Anu. The result is like a spring coiled up and compressed; the spring strives to get back to its normal condition. This condition of tension may account for the FIG- 161. HYDROCHLORIC power of Hydrochloric Acid to eat into things, for as it eats ACID HCI

into things probably the spring strain diminishes.

There is only a slight change in the funnels which radiate from each NalO forming the top and bottom of Chlorine. The twelve funnels in each group still radiate, pointing alternately up and down, but they are nearer to one another than is the case when Chlorine is by itself.

COMMON SALT NaCl

The molecule of common Salt, NaCl, is composed of one atom of Sodium and one atom of Chlorine. Both are of the dumb-bell type. Each consists of a central rod, at each end of which is a sphere, and from each of the two spheres revolve twelve funnels. Detailed descriptions of both have already been given. Fig. 162 shows the salient points of the two elements, a diagram being given of the central rod, of a sphere and of a funnel.

In the central rod of Sodium, there appears a body of six Anu. This body is positive, and appears to act as the centre of the whole atom.

When Sodium and Chlorine combine to make a molecule of Salt, the constituent bodies arrange themselves so as to make a cube. Fig. 165. The 24 Chlorine funnels radiate from the centre of the cube, in groups of three, to the eight corners of the cube; the 24 shorter Sodium funnels radiate, in groups of two, to the 12 middle points of the twelve edges of the cube. A rearrangement takes place in the bodies composing the two rods and in the spheres at each end of the dumb-bell. From the two rods, six groups are made to radiate from the centre to the six middle points of the six faces of the cube. Each of these six groups is as in Fig. 163.

C£AIT*Al SPHZRC Ha CI

C£AIT*Al SPHZRC Ha CI

FIG. 164. CENTRE OF NaCl

FIG. 163. SMALL GROUP IN NaCl

FIG. 164. CENTRE OF NaCl

FIG. 165 MOLECULE OF SALT NaCl

Counting up the individual Anu in Sodium and Chlorine, nil are accounted tor in the molecule of salt.

SALT : 24 Chlorine funnels to eight corners of cube ________________ 600

24 Sodium funnels to the middles of twelve edges of cubc 384

6 bodies of 5 Anu to the middles of six faces of cube ... 30

1.057

FIG. 166. CARBON MONOXIDE CO

FIG. 167 CARBON DIOXIDE C04

CARBON MONOXIDE CO

Carbon Monoxide is a simple combination of Carbon and Oxygen. Carbon is a group of eight funnels pointing to the eight faccs of an octohcdron. Four of its funnels are positive and four negative, with a single Anu linking each pair. In Carbon the grand centre is composed of four positive Anu. not linked to each other.

When combined with Oxygen, the Carbon is broken up. The appearance of the combination is shown in Fig. 166.

The Oxygen atom, unchanged, remains upright, and round its centre but outside there revolve like four moons the four Anu of the Carbon centre. The eight funnels arrange themselves as two groups of four each, and float at the top and bottom of the Oxygen atom. The four funnels, two of which are positive and two negative, revolve on a horizontal plane. They are however flattened, truncated, more pear-shaped than funnel-like.

It should here be mentioned that the particular particle of Carbon Monoxide which was examined was made occultly, that is, not by a laboratory proccss. The clairvoyant investigator made a molecule of Carbon Monoxide by taking Carbon Dioxide CO a and removing from it one Oxygen atom. The resultant CO was then examined. But the Carbon Monoxide made in a laboratory may show some differences from the CO molecule described above.

CARBON DIOXIDE CO,

In this combination, we have one Carbon and two Oxygen atoms. Their appcarance is as in Fig. 167.

The two Oxygen atoms revolve round a common centre, which is composed of the four loose Anu which form the Carbon centre. The four Anu are not at the corners of a tetrahedron : while one of them is in the middle, the remaining three are arranged askew round it.

At either end of each Oxygen atom, there float two funnels from the Carbon atom. They do not revolve flat as in Carbon Monoxide, but stick out more upright, pointing slightly outwards.

SODIUM CARBONATE Na,CO,

Having examined the combination of Carbon with one Oxygen atom and with two Oxygen atoms, the investigation was extended to the configuration of Carbon with three Oxygen atoms. CO, does not exist by itself, but only in combination, so Sodium Carbonate Na,CO„ as easily procurable, was taken for examination. In this there are two atoms of Sodium, one of Carbon and three of Oxygen. The appearance of the molecule is as in Fig. 168.

The grand centre of the whole combination is still the four loose Anu from the Carbon centre. Round this there whirl upright three Oxygen atoms, at the three corners of a triangle. The two Sodium atoms have placed themselves inside two Oxygen atoms, as in Fig. 160. and the eight Carbon funnels float over the ends of the third Oxygen atom.

It is interesting to note that this triangular arrangement of O, has been deduced by Bragg from his X-ray analysis of Calcite and Aragonite, in which the group CO, occurs.

FIG. 168. SODIUM CARBONATE NiuCO,

CALCIUM HYDROXIDE

HG. 169. CALCIUM HYDROXIDE Ca(OH)

Ca IciumCarUlcCaCt

Ca IciumCarUlcCaCt

HG. 170 CALCIUM CARBIDE CaCi

CALCIUM HYDROXIDE Ca(OH),

Calcium is a di-valent element, and when investigated by clairvoyant magnification is seen to be composed of four funnels which radiate from a centre to the four faces of a tetrahedron. The centre of Calcium is a sphere of 80 Anu. and each of the four funnels contains 160 Anu.

The appearance of the Hvdroxyl group OH is given in Fig. 158.

We can follow the arrangement of Calcium Hydroxide Ca (OH), in Fig. 169. Each Hydroxyl group lies at right angles to two funnels of Calcium. The arrangement will be clear if one holds in one's hand a tetrahedron. In Fig. 169 one Oxygen atom, with half-Hydrogen triangles attached to its ends, is shown lying horizontally across at right angles to two Calcium funnels. The second Oxygen atom and its half-Hydrogens will not be seen from the angle of vision selected by the illustrator, as they will be hidden. They arc, however, suggested by dotted lines. Calcium has a sphere as its centre. This of course persists in Ca(OH)„ but it is not shown in our figure.

CALCIUM CARBIDE CaC,

In Calcium Carbide we have one Calcium and two Carbon atoms. In the compound, each Carbon atom divides into four segments, each segment being composed of one positive and one negative Carbon funnel, with their linking Anu.

Calcium has four funnels, directed to the faces of a tetrahedron, and a centre In the combination CaC,. the Calcium centre remains unchanged, but each Calcium funnel swells out to make room for two segments (each of two funnels) of Carbon, as in Fig. 170, which shows one of the funnels.

CALCIUM CARBONATE CaC03

CALCIUM CARBONATE. CaCO.

In CaCO, the central globe of Calcium is not broken up and takes the central position. The general arrangement is like that of Sodium Carbonate where the three Oxygen atoms form pillars at the corners of a triangle. In the Sodium Carbonate NaaCO„ where we have the same CO, group, it will be seen that two of the Oxygen atoms are wound round the Sodium bar. In the case of Calcium Carbonate we again have the three Oxygen pillars but cach of the pillars is associated with part of the Calcium or of the Carbon. Fig. 171.

The central globe of the Calcium. Ca80, is in the middle of the molecule, and the four Anu from the Carbon atom revolve round it like satellites. One of the Oxygen pillars has four Carbon funnels at the top and four at the bottom, and the other two Oxygen atoms each have a funnel of Calcium, Cal60, at top and bottom. Thus they divide the Calcium between them. The three Oxygen atoms are at the points of a triangle and move round in a circle. Because of the heavy centre Ca80, there is a slight curvature inward of the Oxygen pillars which is not shown in the diagram.

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