Chap xxxiii Of the twenty eight Mansions of the Moon and their vertues

L .nd seeing the Moon measureth the whole Zodiack in the space of twenty eight dayes hence is it, that the wise-men of the Indians and ancientest Astrologians have granted twenty eight Mansions to the Moon, which being fixed in the eight sphere, do enjoy (as Alpharus saith) diverse names and proprieties from the diverse Signs and Stars which are contained in them, through which while the Moon wandreth, it obtaineth other and other powers and vertues but every one of these Mansions, according to...

Book Ii

Of the necessity of Mathematical learning, and of the many wonderfull works which are done by Mathematicall Arts only. The Doctrines of Mathematicks are so necessary to, and have such an affinity with Magick, that they that do profess it without them, are quite out of the way, and labour in vain, and shall in no wise obtain their desired effect. For whatsoever things are, and are done in these inferior naturall vertues, are all done, and governed by number, weight, measure, harmony,...

Of Geometrical Figures and Bodies by what vertue they are powerful in Magick and which are agreeable to each Element

Geometricall Figures also arising from numbers, are conceived to be of no less power. Of these first of all, a Circle doth answer to Unity, and the number ten for Unity is the Center, and circumference of all things and the number ten being heaped together retuens into a Unity from whence it had its beginning, being the end, and complements of all numbers. A circle is called an infinite line in which there is no Terminus a quo, nor Terminus ad quem, whose beginning and end is in every point,...

Chap xxxvii Of the Images of the Faces and of those Images which are without the Zodiack

There are besides in the Zodiack thirty six images, according to the number of the faces of the which, as Porphyry saith Teucer the Babylonian long since wrote, who was a most ancient Mathematician, after whom the Arabians also wrote of these things. Therefore it is said, that in the first face of Aries, ascendeth the image of a black man, standing and cloathed in a white garment, girdled about, of a great body, with reddish eyes, and great strength, and like one that is angry and this image...

Of the Images of the Zodiack what vertues they being ingraven receive from the stars

But the Celestial Images, according to whose likeness Images of this kinde are framed, are very many in the heavens Some visible and conspicuous, others onely imaginable, conceived and set down by Egyptians, Indians and Chaldeans Chaldaeans and their parts are so ordered, that even the figures of some of them are distinguished from others for this reason they place in the Zodiack circle twelve general images, according to the number of the signs of these they constituting Aries, Leo, and...

Concerning the agreement of them with the Celestial bodies and what harmony and sound is correspondent of every Star

But understanding now, that of the seven Planets, Saturn, Mars, and the Moon have more of the voice then of the Harmony. Saturn hath sad, hoarse, heavy, and slow words, and sounds, as it were pressed to the Center but Mai's, rough, sharp, threatning threatening great and wrathful words the Moon observeth a mean betwixt these two but Jupiter, Sol, Venus and Mercury, do possess Harmonies yet Jupiter hath grave, constant, fixed, sweet, merry, and pleasant Consorts Sol venerable, settled, pure and...

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Two things which Christ threatens to the Chapter vi. Of the Number of three, and the Scale thereof. The number of three is an incompounded number, a holy number, a number of perfection, a most powerfull number. For there are three persons in God, there are three Theologicall vertues in Religion. Hence it is that this number conduceth to the Ceremonies of God, and Religion, that by the solemnity of which, prayers, and sacrifices are thrice repeated. Whence Virgil sings, Odd numbers to the God...

Book Two Celestial Magic

Chap. v. Chap. vi. Chap. vii. Chap. viii. Chap. ix. Chap. x. Chap. xi. Chap. xii. Chap. xiii. Of the necessity of Mathematicall learning, and of the many wonderfull works which are done by Mathematicall Arts only. Of Numbers, and their power, and vertue. How great vertues Numbers have, as well in Naturall things, as in Supernaturall. Of Unity, and the Scale thereof Of the Number of Two, and the Scale thereof. Of the Number of three, and the Scale thereof. Of the...